University of Wisconsin–Madison

Wisconsin Geospatial News

Maps really do matter!

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For more information on SAGIC, contact Lisa Morrison at (608) 224-4819. Also check out an online photo archive of the event:

SAGIC GIS Day at the Capitol

Wisconsin state agencies convened at the state Capitol building on February 13th for a dynamic exposition of GIS activities happening at the state level.  The presentations and various exhibits showed how maps are helping with some of the most important issues facing agencies and the citizens they serve.

“Maps Matter: Working Together for Wisconsin” was the title of the exposition sponsored by the State Agency Geographic Information Coordination (SAGIC) Team.  Over a dozen state agencies plus the Wisconsin Land Information Association and U.S. Geological Survey met at the state Capitol to not only inform the public about the benefits of GIS, but also help legislators understand how coordinated statewide geospatial information is vital to Wisconsin’s future. 

Six short presentations focused on different aspects of GIS and responding to emergency situations.  WisconsinEye, widely known for their work covering legislative hearings and deliberations, broadcast the talks both online and to cable television subscribers around the state.  Talks from the event are still available from the WisconsinEye video archive.  Presentations included:

  • Lisa Morrison, Dept. of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection – Why Maps Matter, and an Introduction to GIS
  • Ed Wall, Dept. of Justice – Maps Supporting Homeland Security
  • Bill Olivia, Dept. of Transportation – Rebuilding Lake Delton
  • Meg Galloway, Dept. of Natural Resources – Managing Dam Safety
  • Chris Diller, Dept. of Military Affairs – Mapping in the Emergency Operations Center
  • Roxanne Gray, Wisconsin Emergency Management – Maps Assisting Risk Assessment and Mitigation

In addition to the presentations, attendees were able to browse exhibits, posters, and live demonstrations of online mapping applications.  The various exhibits were as diverse as the agencies themselves.  

SAGIC hopes to offer more state agency GIS expositions again in the future, possibly in years opposite the biennial UW-Madison GIS Day event held every-other November.  In all, approximately 125 people attended the February 13th SAGIC event throughout the day.